Sunday, November 23, 2014
Follow Us On Twitter

7 minutes ago
RT @TorontoStar: Soldier Kyle Sinclair, who died this weekend at CFB Petawawa, was the protector of his family. http://t.co/GhdNcyXcrV http


10 minutes ago
RT @dtapscott: Great summary from @CIOInsight 12 Big Ideas from The Digital Economy http://t.co/AA3fwReH4n http://t.co/0JOe4bNoKf


1 hour ago
RT @blairjs17: New instructional video from #Team1stHitting. Getting more hits! http://t.co/liLNFe15zR


3 hours ago
RT @sars_72: @AlsFastball @strombo @RonMacLeanCBC your right George needs to go and Ron needs to come back!!


3 hours ago
Geez @Strombo you just keep lowering the bar; now the other clowns missing ties #ScuzzyLooking. Really miss @RonMacLeanCBC #ClassAct





Announcements

Don't Be a Software Vendor Victim, You Have Choices

Friday, August 7, 2009
Don't Be a Software Vendor Victim, You Have Choices
I was on a call with a client today who is renegotiating a contract with a vendor.  I am not going to name names because it does not make any difference.  It made me angry because the client was acting like a victim.  "What if the vendor comes to audit our software usage and finds we are out compliance.  It might cost us a lot of money".  The client was bending over backwards to try to make sure that they were in compliance.  There is nothing wrong with that.  Most customers do make their best effort to be compliant.  The challenge is that this particular vendor has so much ambiguity in the language of their contracts and policies that the client cannot really tell if they are in compliance.
Here are two examples of ambiguity:
  • The vendor offers a limited use and a full use version of a product.  There is no clear criteria about the limits of use for the limited use version.  Complicating matters, the customer purchased the product before the vendor started to delineate between a limited use and full use version.  So, they also might have used it in ways that go beyond the limited use prior to their being a full use solution.  They are not sure.  I was not sure in some cases. 
At a minimum, when vendors introduce these distinctions, anyone who had bought the product prior to the policy or offering change should be grandfathered.  Period.  Trying to convince the customer that they should pay additionally to get the full use version is just plain wrong (unless they intend to use it going forward in ways that would require the full use version). 


FULL ARTICLE
Copyright © 2002-2014 Phenix Management International
For more information please read our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use
Designed and Hosted by Net Reliant
Powered by Reliant CMS