Saturday, April 19, 2014
Phenix Management International Newsfeed

Monday, November 18, 2013
Toronto, ON
Saturday, November 16, 2013
by Bill Kutik
Saturday, October 12, 2013
HR Executive Magazine
Follow Us On Twitter

11 minutes ago
WAYNE WELLS Inducted into the Peterborough & District Sports Hall of Fame #Fastball http://t.co/SRSnkDnV8Y


23 minutes ago
RT @dlogan19: What I wouldn't do to listen to Bob Cole and Harry Neal right now


1 hour ago
RT @ASAUSASoftball: Game schedule released for the 2014 ISF XIV Women's World Championship @WCSoftball2014 @ISFsoftball http://t.co/mPuW06v


1 hour ago
RT @SnowdonBob: Bruins have hic-cups in 1-0 opening loss. Not time 2 jump off a cliff though, still a long way to go. Too much talent to pa


2 hours ago
RT @MontrealCP: Bourque scores twice, Canadiens clinch 2-0 series lead over Tampa Bay: Rene Bourque scored twice as the Montreal... http://





Announcements

One in five employers uses social networks in hiring process

Tuesday, September 23, 2008
One in five employers uses social networks in hiring process
CareerBuilder.com says one third of hiring managers rejected candidates based on what they found.
Heather Havenstein (Computerworld)


More than one in five US employers search social networking sites to screen job candidates, according to a survey of more than 31,000 employers released by CareerBuilder.com this week.
Of the hiring managers who use social networks, one-third said they found information there that caused them to toss the candidate out of consideration for a job, the survey said.
The study found that the number of hiring managers that are turning to social networks like MySpace and Facebook to delve into candidates' online behavior is increasing quickly: Some 22% of employers said they already peruse social networks to screen candidates, while an additional 9% said they are planning to do so. Only 11% of managers used the technology in 2006.

The top areas of concern found on social networking sites include:

  • Information about alcohol or drug use (41% of managers said this was a top concern);
  • Inappropriate photos or information posted on a candidate's page (40%);
  • Poor communication skills (29%);
  • Bad mouthing of former employers or fellow employees (28%);
  • Inaccurate qualifications (27%);
  • Unprofessional screen names (22%);
  • Notes showing links to criminal behavior (21%); and
  • Confidential information about past employers (19%).
The study did find that 24% of hiring managers found content on social networks that helped convince them to hire a candidate, the study noted. Hiring managers said that profiles showing a professional image and solid references can boost a candidates chances for a job.
"Hiring managers are using the Internet to get a more well-rounded view of job candidates in terms of their skills, accomplishments and overall fit within the company," said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder.com, in a statement. "As a result, more job seekers are taking action to make their social networking profiles employer-friendly. Sixteen percent of workers who have social networking pages said they modified the content on their profile to convey a more professional image to potential employers."
CareerBuilder recommends that job seekers:
Remove pictures, content and links that can send the wrong message to potential employers;
Update social networking profiles regularly to highlight latest accomplishments;
Consider blocking comments to avoid questionable posts; Avoid joining groups whose names could turn off potential employers; and
Consider setting profile to private so only designated friends can view it.
More about Facebook, CareerBuilder
Copyright © 2002-2014 Phenix Management International
For more information please read our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use
Designed and Hosted by Net Reliant
Powered by Reliant CMS